Book Reviews,  Quick Reads

I Am Watching You by Teresa Driscoll

Two girls go away on holiday. One girl comes back. When two young girls meet two young men, fresh out of prison, on their way to London a wary mother looks on while thinking of a way to make sure the girls make it to their intended destination. When the witness, Ella, fails to take action, young Anna doesn’t make it home.

A year later, Anna is still missing and best friend and survivor Sarah is faced with the three-ringed circus that is the anniversary appeal to the kidnappers for Anna’s safe release; that is if she’s still alive. Not only is Ella dealing with the guilt of the missing girl but she’s receiving anonymous threatening letters too.

There are a lot of different points of view shared in this novel but only one, possibly two narrators? From what I gathered while reading this book, Ella or “the witness,” is the sole narrator. That being said she has a first-person point of view into every other character’s storyline which doesn’t make sense.

This tense thriller will have you pointing fingers and questioning everything you are told. This novel is full of little mini-mysteries and provides definite curiosity with every new chapter.

Spoilers

I believe that authors who don’t introduce the eventual criminal until it’s time to take them in are taking the easy way out. I enjoy the challenge of the “who-dunnit” and weaving through characters and their alibis or lack thereof. If you don’t give me a way to figure out the ending myself then how can I, as the reader, enjoy the mystery fully?

That being said I did enjoy this book and found myself gasping a few times and certainly disturbed other times. I found this novel quite intriguing seeing as we find ourselves a year into a missing person case with no answer in sight. It’s intriguing to see the persistence of a family and the grief that plays out after a tragedy.

This book gives a true crime tv feel and will satisfy any Forensic Files fan’s craving for mystery. I Am Watching You wraps up nicely and gives good, solid closure. I’m not a fan of the title of the book but once you reach the end and find out who kidnapped poor Anna Ballard, it all makes sense, just like a true crime tv show.

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